Three things you can do today to manage your content better

Managing content strategically is a tall order. It’s a process that is hard to master, but important to improve constantly. Whether you ...

Three things you can do today to manage your content better

Managing content strategically is a tall order. It’s a process that is hard to master, but important to improve constantly. Whether you have a dedicated “content champion” who is responsible for content management, a team, or nobody at all, here are three ways you can manage your content better today:

Create review cycles by subject matter

Target each review cycle by topic or category, and engage your departmental stakeholders or subject matter experts responsible for reviewing content. Then, decide on a timeline for the review – perhaps once per quarter, once every few months, or once per year? Only you and the teams responsible for reviewing content can decide.

Don’t be surprised if people push back on this; much less be excited! Get buy-in by assuring your stakeholders that review cycles will be done once in a while to ensure you’re using the latest and greatest content. This also means that over time, those stakeholders will spend less time creating or rewriting content. A clever way to position those review cycles!

Assign internal due dates and stick to them

This goes for all teams. Set up due dates in collaboration with your stakeholders who will review content, as well as with your internal teams, and keep everyone accountable. Using this approach will help manage your expectations, as well as the expectations of your subject matter experts. Content management is a cross-departmental team effort, and should be treated as such.

Need an easy way to keep everyone on track? Create a calendar meeting with the task, and due date, and send it off to each stakeholder. Have the stakeholder accept the calendar meeting invite and sell it to them as a “reminder” in place of those endless and dreaded follow-up emails.

Consider removing content that hasn’t been used in the last year or two.

Some of you might cringe at this thought. The thought of deleting content that may come in handy at some point, gives it reason enough to stay. Or does it?

Allow me to explain.

Content not reviewed or touched in some time, is sitting somewhere in your shared drives, or buried somewhere in a folder, is probably outdated or irrelevant by now. It might even be so customized (i.e. concessions for a client), that it shouldn’t even be stored at all.

Best case scenario? You discover that it is good content that just needs to be refreshed. In that case, add it to your list of revitalizing content.

In Short

Content management is one of those tasks that is easy to fall by the wayside, so a conscious effort needs to be made to maintain it. Every organization may have a different process, or no process at all, but give these tips a try, and send me your feedback!